41 Jair, a descendant of Manasseh, captured their settlements and called them Havvoth Jair.[1]

Matthew Henry's Commentary on Numbers 32:41

Commentary on Numbers 32:28-42

(Read Numbers 32:28-42)

Concerning the settlement of these tribes, observe, that they built the cities, that is, repaired them. They changed the names of them; probably they were idolatrous, therefore they should be forgotten. A spirit of selfishness, of seeking our own, not the things of Christ, when each one ought to assist others, is as dangerous as it is common. It is impossible to be sincere in the faith, sensible of the goodness of God, constrained by the love of Christ, sanctified by the power of the Holy Ghost, and yet be indifferent to the progress of religion, and the spiritual success of others, through love of ease, or fear of conflict. Let then your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.

13 The rest of Gilead and also all of Bashan, the kingdom of Og, I gave to the half-tribe of Manasseh. (The whole region of Argob in Bashan used to be known as a land of the Rephaites. 14 Jair, a descendant of Manasseh, took the whole region of Argob as far as the border of the Geshurites and the Maakathites; it was named after him, so that to this day Bashan is called Havvoth Jair.[2] ) 15 And I gave Gilead to Makir.

Matthew Henry's Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:13-15

Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:12-20

(Read Deuteronomy 3:12-20)

This country was settled on the Reubenites, Gadites, and half the tribe of Manasseh: see Numbers 32. Moses repeats the condition of the grant to which they agreed. When at rest, we should desire to see our brethren at rest too, and should be ready to do what we can towards it; for we are not born for ourselves, but are members one of another.