Bible Pathway - July 4, 2018

Read >Psalms 52 – 59

Highlights:

David begins with the end of the wicked and the peace of the Godly. Folly of the Godless and how Israel is restored; a prayer for deliverance from adversaries; treachery of friends; relief from tormentors; safety from enemies.

My soul is among lions: and I lie even among them that are set on fire, even the sons of men, whose teeth are spears and arrows, and their tongue a sharp sword. Be Thou exalted, O God, above the heavens; let Thy glory be above all the earth. They have prepared a net for my steps; my soul is bowed down: they have digged a pit before me, into the midst whereof they are fallen themselves. Selah (Ps. 57:4-6).

There is no doubt that we will encounter rough times in our lives. Sometimes it might even seem that we will be overcome by the enemies that are encamped around us. It is easy to see why at times we might become fearful and even lose hope.

The psalmist sees all the pitfalls being dug around him. The desperation in his prayer is obvious. He is feeling trapped on every side by his enemies. He even speaks of the snares they have laid out to capture him.

It is difficult to know whether David was speaking of physical enemies, spiritual enemies or a combination of both. It would most likely seem to be the latter. It is certain that, at times, David was surrounded by physical enemies, and he had his spiritual battles as well. The context of this prayer seems to reveal this to be a time of both.

More times than not our skirmishes are more of a spiritual nature. This should not belittle our troubles at all. Some of the greatest battles ever fought have been spiritual in nature. For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places (Eph. 6:12).

It should be noted that in the midst of his prayer that David was still offering praise to God. This comes from the heart of a man who had experienced God's deliverance from hard times before. Why would God forsake him now? He knew there was no chance of that happening. The person that knows this can offer praise even during the trial and not only after it. And when they had laid many stripes upon them, they cast them into prison, charging the jailor to keep them safely: Who, having received such a charge, thrust them into the inner prison, and made their feet fast in the stocks. And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them (Acts 16:23-25).

Likewise, we should offer that same kind of praise during our trials. How is this possible? God has brought His people through dark valleys and carried them over high mountains. Therefore, we can have the assurance God will do it again.

Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of His dear Son (Col. 1:13).

Thought for Today:

Pity the fool who says "there is no God." God says they have done abominable iniquity.

Christ Revealed:

As the One who saves those who will call on Him (Ps. 55:16-17). And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the Name of the Lord shall be saved (Acts 2:21; also Rom. 10:13).

Word Studies:

53:3 filthy, corrupt; 55:4 sore, grievously; 55:9 divide their tongues, bring confusion to their counsel; 59:10 prevent, go before.

Prayer Suggestion: Pray to the Lord with sincere lips (Ps. 17:1).

Optional Reading: I Thessalonians 3

Memory Verse for the Week: John 6:44

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