Girdle

Easton’s Bible Dictionary

  1. Heb. hagor, a girdle of any kind worn by soldiers (1 Samuel 18:4; 2 Samuel 20:8; 1 Kings 2:5; 2 Kings 3:21) or women (Isaiah 3:24).
  2. Heb. 'ezor, something "bound," worn by prophets (2 Kings 1:8; Jeremiah 13:1), soldiers (Isaiah 5:27; 2 Samuel 20:8; Ezekiel 23:15), Kings (Job 12:18).
  3. Heb. mezah, a "band," a girdle worn by men alone (Psalm 109:19; Isaiah 22:21).
  4. Heb. 'abnet, the girdle of sacerdotal and state officers (Exodus 28:4,39,40; 29:9; 39:29).
  5. Heb. hesheb, the "curious girdle" (Exodus 28:8; R.V., "cunningly woven band") was attached to the ephod, and was made of the same material.

The common girdle was made of leather (2 Kings 1:8; Matthew 3:4); a finer sort of linen (Jeremiah 13:1; Ezekiel 16:10; Daniel 10:5). Girdles of sackcloth were worn in token of sorrow (Isaiah 3:24; 22:12). They were variously fastened to the wearer (Mark 1:6; Jeremiah 13:1; Ezekiel 16:10).

The girdle was a symbol of strength and power (Job 12:18,21; 30:11; Isaiah 22:21; 45:5). "Righteousness and faithfulness" are the girdle of the Messiah (Isaiah 11:5).

Girdles were used as purses or pockets (Matthew 10:9; A. V., "purses;" R.V., marg., "girdles." Also Mark 6:8).

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